Succeeding In American Education

In the business of quality education, nothing succeeds like failure. Every commission report that rails against the mediocrity of our schools translates into a multimillion-dollar government program for education. Every time the literacy rate or the SAT scores decline we get another batch of reforms to raise teacher salaries and fund innovative techniques. No matter what is wrong with the schools, the response is invariably “more”–more spending, more programs, more reports. In the private sector this is called rewarding incompetence. In public education it’s called “investing in our future.”

America has a blind faith in the melioristic power and perfectibility of its public schools. In her outstanding history of post-world War II education, The Troubled Crusade, Diane Ravitch notes the pattern:

Probably no other idea has seemed more typically American than the belief that schooling can cure society’s ills. Whether in the early nineteenth century or the twentieth, Americans have argued for more schooling on the grounds that it

 

Science And Engineering Key To The Future Of America

Most deans also believe students from high school to kindergarten must receive more exposure to science and engineering.

A program at Northeastern University (Boston, MA) is trying to provide that exposure. Northeastern sponsors 2- to 4-week seminars for high-school faculty members in an effort to improve their methods of teaching and to introduce students to engineering.

AT the University of Massachusetts (Amherts, MA), summer sessions in engineering target high-school students. Students learn about personal computers and low-level engineering and visit nearby electronics companies.

The AEA has also taken an active interest in upgrading education in math and science at both the elementary and high-school levels. It produces and distributes “The K-12 Model Program Guide For Industry/Education Partnerships” on a quarterly basis. This guide outlines various programs that have been successfully implemented across the US to enhance math and science education. The AEA hopes other schools will emulate these programs.

Women and minorities

As the white-male population continues to decrease, universities

 

Satellite And Remote Courses Becoming Huge

Satellite and microwave transmissions have become commonplace in continuing education. Transmissions are typically set up between a university and a corporation, and both satellite and microwave transmissions allow for 2-way audio, which means engineers can ask professors questions during the lecture, just as if they were in the campus classroom. Stanford University and the University of Massachusetts are just two examples of universities that run such programs.

Distances no longer a problem.

Some companies have even moved beyond the one-university, one-corporation satellite link. Texas Instruments, in conjunction with Southern Methodist University (Dallas, TX), created an extended continuing education system that serves Northern Texas. Called The Association for Graduate Education and Research, or TAGER, and now operated independently by the Texas Association for Higher Education (Dallas, TX), the network includes SMU, the University of Dallas, the University of Northern Texas, and the University of Texas at Arlington. The network transmits classes via microwave to a variety of subscribers, including Motorola, Rockwell

 

Hitting Mathematics Where It Hurts; Artificial Intelligence

Beyond being “whatever mathematicians do”, mathematics is the study of abstract structures: integers or points in space, for instance, or sets, and sets of sets. The beauty of mathematics is revealed when we develop a deeper understanding of such structures. To cope with mathematical abstractions, people have used practical representations as a way to visualize mathematical ideas ever since they first realized they had ten fingers.

Tracing the history of technology in mathematics, we see the invention and use of the abacus, the quipu, Napier’s bones, and the slide rule, all of which were improved ways of manipulating numbers. Drawings have always been used as a tool to express geometric ideas; Archimedes was slain as he pondered a drawing in the sand. The ruler and the compass were more than just drawing tools to the ancient Greeks. Their use inspired deep mathematical questions as to what could and could not be drawn with them–questions that eventually led to the development …

 

Creating A Business From The Ability To Repair a Failed Hard Drive

Do you own a business venture that needs to know how to repair a failed hard drive? This is an ideal business venture because computer peripherals fail from time to time making your services ideal to many people. However, you should market yourself in order to make sure that you reach out to your potential clients. This marketing venture is done by approaching marketing agencies or placing advertisements on media publications like newspapers, magazines and journals. Attending information technology seminars and symposiums is also a way of reaching out to people whose computer parts have problems. You can also write articles on blogs, websites and discuss related issues with people on online forums. These websites and blogs should have the best choice of colors and layout to catch the eyes of a reader. Content should also be readable and captivating. In addition to that you can seek people close to you to give you relevant recommendations. However, you must budget for this advertising venture in order to make sure that costs are within your budget. Comparing different costs of advertisement is the best way to ensure that you choose the most affordable means of advertising. Also you should choose a means that is accessible to your target market. Before embarking on this, you should make sure that you have sufficient skill to attend to customer requests.

Do you know how to repair a failed hard drive? This is an ideal venture to those who want to buy devices that are not functioning properly. However, you should have enough technical skills to handle these devices. This is because you also need to analyze them accurately in order to determine the main reason why they are not performing properly – click here. You should also have proper knowledge on how to recover user data. This is because Read the rest of this entry »

 

Staying Competitive With Literacy

The US work force has a literacy rate of 80 percent while Japan’s is 95 percent: Better education could strengthen economic competitiveness.

To meet today’s challenges, our educational system should be producing thoughtful and creative workers. But our schools don’t measure up. What if children grew up enjoying learning and maintained that attitude? Their responses to our troubled future would be better guided, more thoughtful, more intelligent. This should be the goal for our schools; and technology can help. Revolutionizing our schools won’t be a quick fix, but in the long run ignorance is far more costly.

Literacy pays dividends.

The business sector has a longterm interest in educational improvement. A recent article in Business Week, “Human Capital: The Decline of America’s Work Force,” concludes that “investments in education and training will yield sure-fire retums we can’t afford to ignore.” The computer industry, too, should take a leading, pro-active role in the coming educational revolution. Along with fierce competition to produce workstations for industry at large, the computer industry should cooperate to mass-produce powerful and inexpensive IMM learnstations.

Hi-tech Solutions

The techno-entrepreneurial spirit delights in finding hi-tech solutions for the problems of a broad market. The data recovery sector, as an example, continues to benefit from a variety of mac hard drive failure solutions like these. Profits from the educational market could be the industry’s impetus for improving educational technology. With a half million new students joining grades K-12 each year-for a total of 44 million by the year 1997 -the potential is great.

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